Yoga questions.

Q&A and discussion on yoga and other avenues of mysticism

Moderator: Moderators - Public

Yoga questions.

Postby Ankh » Fri Dec 28, 2007 7:06 am

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

I Just recently found a yoga studio that practices traditional classical Indian Hatha and Raja Yoga. It is close to my home and reasonably priced. I have three questions that I hope someone can help me out with.

1. What questions should I ask the instructor to make sure I am not wasting my time and money?
2. Are there any dangers involved with these types of yoga practices? And if so, what are they?
3. And finally, this is the real question. Would these two systems of yoga help with the grade work in T.O.T and the A.A.?

BTW, I know absolutely No-Thing about yoga, so any input would be greatly appreciated. :new:

Thank you
Love is the law, love under will.
AL III,17: “Fear not at all; fear neither men nor Fates, nor gods, nor anything. Money fear not, nor laughter of the folk folly, nor any other power in heaven or upon the earth or under the earth. Nu is your refuge as Hadit your light; and I am the strength, force, vigour, of your arms.”
User avatar
Ankh
Stone of Precious Water
Stone of Precious Water
 
Posts: 215
Joined: Sat Apr 29, 2006 11:08 pm

Re: Yoga questions.

Postby Jim Eshelman » Fri Dec 28, 2007 9:24 am

Ankh wrote:1. What questions should I ask the instructor to make sure I am not wasting my time and money?

I'll leave this one for others to answer - nothing particularly comes to mind - except two thoughts. First, no such work is ever a waste if it's of even minimal competency. Second, the rest of your question is pretty much a standard consumer question, i.e., getting your feel of the place and its people and whether you want to do business with them.

That is, yoga studios are generally just another kind of store. Approach it the way you'd approach selecting a gym, auto insurance provider, or travel agent.

2. Are there any dangers involved with these types of yoga practices? And if so, what are they?

With a competent teacher, no dangers of note. The key points are: Pranayama, beyond certain very basic work, should only be done under the supervision of an experienced teacher (not necessarily right there with you physically, but in-person training and access as needed). Any arising kundalini phenomena should be immediately discussed, again preferably with someone who knows you personally etc. Any significant psychological changes or altered behavior should be observed with the same eye you would observe and consider someone undergoing intensive psychotherapy.

3. And finally, this is the real question. Would these two systems of yoga help with the grade work in T.O.T and the A.A.?

First of all, no such work is wasted even if not on a particular curriculum. Second, based only on what you've described, you would be practicing the same sort of things that are undertaken in various A.'.A.'. Grades, so it would be directly applicable. Third, it would support T.'.O.'.T.'. work indirectly, though these exact subjects aren't taught in the First Order other than certain basics that are the foundation of other work.

BTW, I know absolutely No-Thing about yoga, so any input would be greatly appreciated.

Possibly one good way to assess the center is to say this exact sentence to them and see how they answer it, how they orient you, etc.
Love is the law, love under will.
Yours in L.V.X.,
Jim Eshelman
www.jeshelman.com
"Success is thy proof: argue not; convert not; talk not overmuch!" - CCXX 3:42
User avatar
Jim Eshelman
Lost His Marbles
 
Posts: 9585
Joined: Sat Jun 04, 2005 1:41 pm
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Postby gmugmble » Fri Dec 28, 2007 12:08 pm

You might talk to some of the "regulars" -- the people who have been attending the lessons for some time -- to see what their experience has been. Chances are, you've found a good deal, and I hope you get a lot of benefit from it. But I feel like I should retail a bad experience I once had.

I signed up for yoga at a place that was conveniently on my way home from work. They had an up-and-up store front and the people who ran it seemed nice. But the lessons were unlike any kind of yoga I had read about, and I found myself being pressured to adopt the views of their founder, and especially to spend lots of money on special lectures, special equipment, special lessons, etc. When I declined to do this, I was pressured all the more. Finally, I just quite attending. (Later, I looked this school up on the internet, and found that other people were calling it a cult.)

I hope this doesn't frighten you away from the school you've found. I think my experience is the exception and that you've probably found something of use. But caveat emptor.
-- Robert W

"Friends in the Dharma, be satisfied with your own heads. Do not put any false heads above your own. Then, minute after minute, watch your step closely." -- Nyogen Senzaki
User avatar
gmugmble
Ultimate Spark of the Intimate Fire
Ultimate Spark of the Intimate Fire
 
Posts: 533
Joined: Fri Oct 26, 2007 4:42 pm
Location: Everett, WA, USA

Postby Ankh » Sat Dec 29, 2007 7:36 am

93 Jim,

Jim wrote:I'll leave this one for others to answer - nothing particularly comes to mind - except two thoughts. First, no such work is ever a waste if it's of even minimal competency. Second, the rest of your question is pretty much a standard consumer question, i.e., getting your feel of the place and its people and whether you want to do business with them.

The competency level appears to be good; the instructor says he has about 30 years of practice and 15 years of teaching.

Jim wrote:That is, yoga studios are generally just another kind of store. Approach it the way you'd approach selecting a gym, auto insurance provider, or travel agent.

That was my feeling also, this place was mildly commercial. Not that commercial is bad (everyone has to pay there bills.)

Jim wrote:With a competent teacher, no dangers of note. The key points are: Pranayama, beyond certain very basic work, should only be done under the supervision of an experienced teacher (not necessarily right there with you physically, but in-person training and access as needed). Any arising kundalini phenomena should be immediately discussed, again preferably with someone who knows you personally etc. Any significant psychological changes or altered behavior should be observed with the same eye you would observe and consider someone undergoing intensive psychotherapy.

This is what I needed to hear. What to approach with caution and what to say away from in the beginning stages. Thank you.

Jim wrote:First of all, no such work is wasted even if not on a particular curriculum. Second, based only on what you've described, you would be practicing the same sort of things that are undertaken in various A.'.A.'. Grades, so it would be directly applicable. Third, it would support T.'.O.'.T.'. Work indirectly, though these exact subjects aren't taught in the First Order other than certain basics that are the foundation of other work.

Stellar! :twisted: 8) :twisted:

Jim wrote:Possibly one good way to assess the center is to say this exact sentence to them and see how they answer it, how they orient you, etc.

True. I have done that before in other life situations, it has given me insight as to how the operation is run and who I can trust.

Thank for your input Jim, it is Greatly Appreciated. :D
Last edited by Ankh on Sat Dec 29, 2007 8:03 am, edited 3 times in total.
AL III,17: “Fear not at all; fear neither men nor Fates, nor gods, nor anything. Money fear not, nor laughter of the folk folly, nor any other power in heaven or upon the earth or under the earth. Nu is your refuge as Hadit your light; and I am the strength, force, vigour, of your arms.”
User avatar
Ankh
Stone of Precious Water
Stone of Precious Water
 
Posts: 215
Joined: Sat Apr 29, 2006 11:08 pm

Postby Ankh » Sat Dec 29, 2007 7:47 am

93 gmugmble,

You might talk to some of the "regulars" -- the people who have been attending the lessons for some time -- to see what their experience has been.
Yeah, how does that saying go? Yea shall judge the tree by there roots, fruits, and nuts? :lol:

Chances are, you've found a good deal, and I hope you get a lot of benefit from it.
Thank you for the encouragement, since I don’t know a whole lot about the subject of yoga, I am sure that why I’m little skeptical.

I signed up for yoga at a place that was conveniently on my way home from work. They had an up-and-up store front and the people who ran it seemed nice. But the lessons were unlike any kind of yoga I had read about, and I found myself being pressured to adopt the views of their founder, and especially to spend lots of money on special lectures, special equipment, special lessons, etc. When I declined to do this, I was pressured all the more. Finally, I just quite attending. (Later, I looked this school up on the internet, and found that other people were calling it a cult.)

I hope this doesn't frighten you away from the school you've found. I think my experience is the exception and that you've probably found something of use. But caveat emptor.
Thank you for sharing your story gmugmble. Caveat emptor! :wink:
AL III,17: “Fear not at all; fear neither men nor Fates, nor gods, nor anything. Money fear not, nor laughter of the folk folly, nor any other power in heaven or upon the earth or under the earth. Nu is your refuge as Hadit your light; and I am the strength, force, vigour, of your arms.”
User avatar
Ankh
Stone of Precious Water
Stone of Precious Water
 
Posts: 215
Joined: Sat Apr 29, 2006 11:08 pm


Return to Mysticism

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests