13 November (Nuit) Liber CCXX, 1:5-6

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13 November (Nuit) Liber CCXX, 1:5-6

Postby Jim Eshelman » Sun Nov 13, 2011 11:52 pm

5. Help me, o warrior lord of Thebes, in my unveiling before the Children of men!
6. Be thou Hadit, my secret centre, my heart & my tongue!
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Re: 13 November (Nuit) Liber CCXX, 1:5-6

Postby gmugmble » Mon Nov 14, 2011 7:35 am

Nuit, in the persona of Mae West perhaps, sidles up to the prophet and vamps, "Help me slip my clothes off, you big hunk of a warrior lord, you."

I say again, what a way to found a religion!
-- Robert W

"Friends in the Dharma, be satisfied with your own heads. Do not put any false heads above your own. Then, minute after minute, watch your step closely." -- Nyogen Senzaki
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Re: 13 November (Nuit) Liber CCXX, 1:5-6

Postby Jim Eshelman » Tue Nov 15, 2011 9:23 am

Jim Eshelman wrote:5. Help me, o warrior lord of Thebes, in my unveiling before the Children of men!
6. Be thou Hadit, my secret centre, my heart & my tongue!

These verses provide the first practical instruction of the Book. Fully understood, it is an entire course of mysticism. It's instruction, in essence, is the simplest. Nuit tells us, "Be Hadit!"

To the extent that we succeed in this, we are her most precious lover. With all the mythic and mathematical that can be said about these verses, the simple message is that we are to be Him that is the secret centre of Her that is the Holy Guardian Angel expressed as infinite and invincible love.

PS - Verse 5, which would correspond to Geburah, speaks of a war-lord! And v. 6, corresponding to Tiphereth, speaks of the "secret centre."

As the text upon the Stélé 666 makes plain, the "warrior lord of Thebes" being mentioned is the god Mentu, who is barely distinguishable from Horus. (The only other god I can find who bore that title is Horus himself.) Nuit is calling upon Mentu (or possibly Horus) to serve this role. Yet, in reading the passage, it is abominably hard not to take it personally - not to find oneself in the direct line of the call. It isn't difficult to see why Crowley felt he was being called by this title, because the emotional impact of v. 5 is that it is oneself that is being called.
Love is the law, love under will.
Yours in L.V.X.,
Jim Eshelman
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"Success is thy proof: argue not; convert not; talk not overmuch!" - CCXX 3:42
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