23 January (Heru-Ra-Ha) Liber CCXX, 3:35-37

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23 January (Heru-Ra-Ha) Liber CCXX, 3:35-37

Postby Jim Eshelman » Mon Jan 23, 2012 5:36 am

(v. 180) 35. The half of the word of Heru-ra-ha, called Hoor-pa-kraat and Ra-Hoor-Khut.
(v. 181) 36. Then said the prophet unto the God:
(v. 182) 37. I adore thee in the song —
I am the Lord of Thebes, and I/ The inspired forth-speaker of Mentu;/ For me unveils the veilèd sky/ The self-slain Ankh-af-na-khonsu/ Whose words are truth. I invoke, I greet/ Thy presence, O Ra-Hoor-Khuit!
Unity uttermost showed!/ I adore the might of Thy breath,/ Supreme and terrible God,/ Who makest the gods and death/ To tremble before Thee:—/ I, I adore thee!
Appear on the throne of Ra!/ Open the ways of the Khu!/ Lighten the ways of the Ka!/ The ways of the Khabs run through/ To stir me or still me!/ Aum! let it fill me!
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Re: 23 January (Heru-Ra-Ha) Liber CCXX, 3:35-37

Postby Jim Eshelman » Mon Jan 23, 2012 5:46 am

Aiwass wrote:(v. 180) 35. The half of the word of Heru-ra-ha, called Hoor-pa-kraat and Ra-Hoor-Khut.

What has long intrigued me of this verse is that it is the 180th in the entire Book; and 180 is the number of degrees that marks half a circle.

This is hardly the half-way point of the Book, nor the half-way point of the third chapter. It isn't as though this verse demarcated a line separating a Ra-Hoor-Khuit section from a Hoor-Paar-Kraat section; nothing so simple was done. In fact, while the meaning of the verse seems clear enough on the surface, what is not clear is why it is exactly here. What does it do for the continuity? Why is it in this exact position?

I believe this verse is pointedly here, in the 180th place, to confirm the nature of the internal architecture of the Book, the significance of continuous verse enumeration from 1 through 220.

Also, though it is not the half-way point of the chapter, it does mark a critical thematic turning point, if my working model is correct (as it appears to be). Specifically, I hold that this Book is divided into 22 sets of 10 verses each, which correspond to the Hebrew letters from א to ת within which the sephiroth show from 1 to 10. The first five verses of this chapter were at the tail end of the Samekh set. (Verse 1, announcing “Abrahadabra,” was the Tiphereth verse of the Samekh series, which is about as perfect as things get.) Thereafter, we have encountered 30 consecutive verses composing the series of ע (Capricorn, where Mars is exalted), then פ (Mars itself), then צ; (Aries, where Mars rules by day). These would be, theoretically, the largest collective of patently martial verses in the entire Book, and they have not disappointed me in this regard.

Now this present verse marks the end of that. It is the tenth and last verse (Malkuth) of the Tzaddi series. It draws the line. The very next verse - the first of a new series - clearly begins a new theme and goes off in another direction. The remainder of the chapter contains the 40 verses attributed to Qoph, Resh, Shin, and Tav. (Those four last letters total to exactly 1,000.)

Or such is my understanding.

I consider this an important discovery; and it is the only thing that seems to explain why this present verse is here, now.

(v. 181) 36. Then said the prophet unto the God:
(v. 182) 37. I adore thee in the song —
I am the Lord of Thebes, and I/ The inspired forth-speaker of Mentu;/ For me unveils the veilèd sky/ The self-slain Ankh-af-na-khonsu/ Whose words are truth. I invoke, I greet/ Thy presence, O Ra-Hoor-Khuit!
Unity uttermost showed!/ I adore the might of Thy breath,/ Supreme and terrible God,/ Who makest the gods and death/ To tremble before Thee:—/ I, I adore thee!
Appear on the throne of Ra!/ Open the ways of the Khu!/ Lighten the ways of the Ka!/ The ways of the Khabs run through/ To stir me or still me!/ Aum! let it fill me!

(We now begin the Qoph section of verses. As I look ahead, I see that this has a clear beginning in the text of the stélé, and a clear ending in the three verses pertaining to the Scarlet Woman.)

Verses 37 and 38 contain five verses from the stélé of revealing. However, what Crowley made of it is something entirely different! Instead of a dead man’s headstone, now it is verse for life, a verse suitable for the foundation of a new Great Work. These lines, as rewritten by him (and then inserted into the Book at Aiwass' explicit instructions), are among the most potent spells in the whole of Liber L.

Any actual meditation on these verses at the present time would be inconsequential compared to 16 years of their reverent repetition: How sublime the recognition of that “Unity” which is “uttermost showed!” The rest flows naturally, provided one gets that initial experience or relationship.

“forth-speaker” is a literal of “prophet.” The “throne of Ra,” or “throne of the Sun,” is the heart, and Ra-Hoor-Khuit, the HGA, is being invoked to “appear” there.

The “Aum” produces a profound silence if one will let it; and then “it” fills one, and there is no question but that, “The light is mine; its rays consume me.”
Love is the law, love under will.
Yours in L.V.X.,
Jim Eshelman
www.jeshelman.com
"Success is thy proof: argue not; convert not; talk not overmuch!" - CCXX 3:42
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